Masterson’s 4-U Method-Write Sales Copy Power Headers
- Digital Marketing, Marketing

Masterson’s 4-U Method-Write Sales Copy Power Headers

Writing should have a perspective, and it must give character to your objective. No one can ensure that a blog, article, or mere email can get you a sale. Whenever you write sales copy power headers, being creative helps you attract an audience. Headings assist you in organizing lengthier pieces of writing and make it easier for the readers to find their way through a document.

4 U’s formula states that material should be Urgent, Unique, Useful, and Ultra-specific. This technique and strategy, developed by entrepreneur and business coach Michael Masterson, works effectively for headlines, titles, and email subject lines. With a little modification, it can also be used to write excellent blog posts.

The header (or title) of a direct-mail sales letter, a flyer, a brochure, or a classified/display ad makes up around 80% of the content. You’ve probably heard that creating effective headlines is an important skill for every writer. However, in this era of digitization and technical Innovation, where readers are more informed and selective about what to read, whether online or in print, they are inundated with information. 

The readers browse and then decide which portions to read in-depth. Therefore, it becomes important for a marketer to understand sales strategy and the importance of including a 4-U formula whenever they write a social media post, blog, or article. The title should grab the eye, create anticipation and make the audience curious to open it.

The “4 U’s” of Creative headlines:

  • Unique
  • Ultra-specific
  • Useful
  • Urgent

Unique: Differentiate, and grab attention

Visitors will ignore your content/blog if your content is not unique or if they have seen similar content elsewhere. Everything from your writing style to the advantage visitors receives from reading your content contributes to the originality of your copy.

Useful: Promise a benefit

Create a relevant headline by emphasizing its usefulness. What follows will benefit the reader by resolving an issue, answering a question, or providing a solution. When a reader finds your headline useful, he will want to explore more and continue reading. Thus, a good headline focuses only on the reader’s benefit.

Urgent: Encourage the reader to react

Ultra-specific: include the needs of your target audience

The use of urgency in headlines persuades recipients to open the email, read the article, or buy the product or service. In addition, urgency in the information itself aids readers in applying the utility factor to solve issues or achieve goals more quickly.

Ultra-specific: include the needs of your target audience

 

Content can be beneficial even if it is not specific, but the more detailed your text is, the more useful it will be. A title with a lot of specifics is called an ultra-specific headline. It can incorporate data, show steps, identify a specific or exclusive piece of information, or provide a unique perspective.

Unique: Differentiate, and grab attention

Conclusion

Being lucid is an art. Only 80% of individuals will read the headline, but just 20% will read the rest of the content. So it’s up to you how you write your heading that compels your reader to open and read. These 4 “U’s” assist you in writing content that positions your company’s goods and services in a way that impacts your potential clients’ and customers’ business realities. It’s not just about selling a product or service; it’s about selling YOU and what sets your company apart from the competition.

Masterson’s 4-U Method-Write Sales Copy Power Headers

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